Collection: Part 1

Research

All text seen is written by me -  unless directly copied from websites in which the text shall be highlighted in italics.

All research for all work for part 1 is displayed on this page- simply keep scrolling down to get to more recent work and vice versa.

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IDEAS FACTORY

Gerd Arntz 1931

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8/9/16 - Gerd Arntz

Today in class we were given art practitioner and me and my group were given Gerd Arntz. Gerd Arntz was German and was born into a family of traders and manufacturers. He sought inspiration from political artists which lead him to his art becoming  his communication of wanting a democratic government with more power to the people, as well as refuting against nazism and war. This is why a lot of his artwork focuses or depicts themes of inequality, class and technology in the city. He then gained attention by Otto Neurath who was a social scientist that needed a designer to create simple images that could easily represent these complicates themes, this lead to create his works of ISOTYPE. He created about 4000 different pictograms that described these themes. He was a socialist and in his early twenties left his bourgeois family to seek a life in the lower classes which inspired him to make his woodcut prints of the themes that arouse from his difficult experiences within this transition. the majority of his pieces are in simple black and white woodcuts however he ventured on later into lino prints. He was inspired by art movements such as expressionism and constructivism. with the encouragement and steady income of Neurath he progressed to be successful graphic designer creating his ISOTYPEs. 

https://www.brainpickings.org/2011/03/09/gerd-artnz-graphic-designer/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerd_Arntz

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Constructivism Art

Was a philosophy started in Russia by Vladmir Tatlin that opposed the idea of autonomous art - he wanted "construct art". A lot of constructivist artist worked into poster art ranging from cinemas to propaganda and embraced simplicity and also affected architecture. It was taking materials and constructing it into ideas that could be mass produced. the art produced did not carry teh purpose of expressing the artists feelings but instead was used to demonstrate how materials behaved - the material defined what the art would be (not the other way around). It expressed the experience of modern life and were also searching and constructing answers from problems of the modern world.

http://www.theartstory.org/movement-constructivism.htm

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Expressionism

Was an art movement that contained an anxiety of being disconnected with spirituality and loss of authenticity. It encourages distortion of from and using bright colours to convey the accents of anxiety and worry and involved heavily on the Artists feelings. A lot of the pieces depicted critiques of the inner self being placed in the developing world and inner feelings of being confused and nervous of the present and future.

http://www.theartstory.org/movement-expressionism.htm

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Meghan Willis

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Meghan Willis

After looking through pinterest at related artists to embroidery i fell upon this artist who explored female sexuality within her embroidery. By using the material of stitching the viewer is naturally flows through the dedicated stitching, caressing with their eyes the body of the females she depicts exposing the controversial subject of female sexuality. Being a female myself this issue of female sexuality and the hush talk of female biology is close to home. she sews on linen, with machine applied leather applique and hand painting. She depicts a series of confident women exploring freely and boldly their sexuality. A lot of her inspiration came from her friend Kate Sweeney who is a photographer. She remained the focus on women as in University she did fashion and design and mainly drew woman within her pieces. She is currently working on pieces investigating sex toys and the "hush hush" on sexuality. What i love about her work is simply the style and the texture that the embroidery gives, i also love the images she chooses to translate onto her fabric, and i thin i could incorporate this style into my stitching.

http://tsurubride.com/

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Lisa Smirnova

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Lisa Smirnova

Lisa moulds her intricate  embroidery with the detailed pencil drawings to be able to with stitching rendition of  Frida Kahlo and Charles Bukowski.Her materials consist if thread cotton and wool styled with am impressionist feel created beautiful portrait pieces as well as detailed embroidery on clothing, coupled with some surrealistic threading of monsters from childhood stories and fairy tales. Her pieces can easily take up over 100 hours. Her latest works were named "Artists at home" where she co-worked with GO, Olga Glagoleva. The whole collection was inspired by Artist's work clothes and delivers the intricate and beautiful relationship between the artist's home studio, work and attire. The embroidery was done on cashmere, cotton and organic-hemp fabrics. 

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Stuart Haygarth

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Stuart Haygarth

The images above and below are both from the series "Tools of the trade".The picture above is of plastic pipettes used in science and the image below is made of compiled plastic petri dishes. The items were chosen purely for aesthetic reasons. by compiling mass amounts of these plastic forms in a modular way, the result is a beautiful transformation of the individual units into a greater whole. Haygarth seeks to elevate standard discarded ordinary object to a new dimension of form and structure. Transforming the randomness of the waste and objects he collects into organised pieces of symmetry and design, the addition of light amplifies the beauty of the objects metamorphosis. His work has given my a insight into how to transform objects into something vastly different and still look extremely elegant and beautiful. This has opened my mind into trying to approach materials differently.

http://www.stuarthaygarth.com/

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Petri dishes- Stuart Haygarth

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12/9/16

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Tehila Guy - Inflatable chair

After realising that plastic was extremely important within interior design (something I did not previously acknowledge or consider) after finding a enormous amount of books with plastic furniture I decided to do more online research on interior design that involved plastics. I found this designer- Tehila Guy which had a similar design to the chairs i saw in the library. She was inspired by the convenience of flat packed furniture but still wanted the design to look aesthetically pleasing. This chair is clever as it does not use the same material and assembly methods but instead it uses and inflatable seat and a few rods, with clear plastic to show the wooden rod structure. Guy also wanted the chair to be easy to maintain, and plastic was the perfect choice than the usual cotton or leather styled chairs. Guy in an interview said that she actually got the design idea from the 60s where this type of styled chair was at its peak. originally i hated the idea of plastic being used in design as i thought it was  an extremely cheap looking material that has very limited class and sophisticated style. But Guy has changed my viewpoint on this and now i look at plastic very differently as i think she has successfully created a beautiful chair that does not look in anyway cheap. I love the design and the combination of combination materials such a wood and plastic- the wood gives the chair a more organic homey feel which transforms the aesthetic of plastic.

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12/9/16

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Library Research 12/9/16

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Harun Faroki 1944-2004

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Workers leaving the Factory in 11 Decades 2006

Farocki's installation consists of video, 12 channels, 12 monitor, colour and sound. The big box tvs shows some of films first and earliest films ranging from Charlie Chaplin, La sorttie de l'usine Lumiere A lyon, Metropolis (Fritz Lang), Lars Von trier, elkosota etc. Farocki's emphasis on labour and factory is highlighted constantly throughout the films. In one box TV it shows the celebrity Marilyn Monroe stepping out of one- this shows the unequal almost, fanatical idea that celebrities do hard manual labour in order to survive. This irony brings to questions the fairness of people's lives and industry. the films also highlight the moment between work and leisure time. Not only the piece tackle the questions raised by what is in the films themselves they also raise awareness to the development of film and the style and content of how it has developed. The fact that the films are displayed on "old school"  box Tvs gives an atmosphere of long history and time, almost as if one is looking into the past through the screens. This allows the viewer to reflect and ponder of the development of Film as well as the issues raised within the films themselves. Overtime the style he developed and the pieces he created was a critique on how media shapes peoples opinions, contemporary life and ideology.

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Lorna Simpson

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Five day Forecast 1991

This piece is made of gelatin silver print on paper and 15 engraved plaques. A normal portrait's function is to communicate something unique about its subject or perhaps to give a decent amount of information for the viewer to make sense of the portrait. However Simpson does the opposite by removing the heads of the portraits creating 'anti-portraits'. The style of the black and white portraits recall the conventions fo nineteenth century ethnographic photography. By using this process and style the subject losing their individuality and unique qualities and represents a wider group other than themselves. But Simpson cropped the head out of the photo to avoid scrutiny of the individual- By doing this the subject in the image will always inaccessible to the viewer. Even the engravings at the top and bottom effectively aid the piece such as "Misinformation, misdescription,misidentify,misconstrue..."- this clearly conveys the prejudice black lives face constantly. the repetition of the harsh black and white engravements with the portraits re-iterates the judgement and inequality the subjects face. I think the arrangement is very affect as it shows that these lives deal with this misjudgment every day. 

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Tom Friedman

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Refuge Wear

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Hussein Chalayan

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27/9/16- Malika Favre

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Research

Immediately when i saw Malika Favre work in class i loved the clean cut style of her work. It its a beautiful hybrid of OpArt and Pop art that merge together to create beautiful illustrations. Another aspect of her work i liked was her ability to understand how to easily make her pieces moving images and create beautiful simplistic transitions that just effortlessly moved onto the next frame. I love her use of bold colours and clean cut illustrations that aesthetically look beautiful, modern and crisp. She also is able to use these illustration and turn them into typography and create a typeface. An example is the Karma sutra typeface she created for Penguin Books which involved illustrations based on sex positions. Not only are they beautifully finished by also they are extremely creative and clever in their design and are still eligible. She started her work at airside for an illustration company however decided to be a freelancer. in an interview she claims this is were she was able to express herself fully and be free to do illustration that was true in her style. She is famous for her "girls" that she has been drawing since she was 9 and is now one of her signature marks. I love her understanding of simplicity and shapes to create beautiful clean images. I also appreciate her transition of basic vertical horizontal and diagonal lines in her moving images to create almost a effortless liquid flow into the next frame which makes me think of how to animate my drawings.

http://malikafavre.com/     http://www.itsnicethat.com/features/malika-favre-interview

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Herb Lubalin

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Herb Lubalin

Herb :abalin was an american graphic designer that collaborated with Ralph Ginzburg on three magazines Eros, Avant Garde and Fact, and created beautiful typefaces that remained throughout these publications and was responsible for the visual elegance. He is well known for his typeface "ITC AVANT GARDE" whom still inspires and has inspired contemporary typographers. When initially working on Avant Garde, it became apparent that the logo was difficult due to the difficulties made by the incompatible letterform. Lubalin solution was to create a tight fitted letterform combinations to create a sharp, futuristic and recognisable identity- the Avant Garde typeface we now know today. However Lubalin quickly realised that the typeface was being overused by people who did not understand the art of typography and it became a "sterotypical" typeface. During his time in Avant Garde Lubalin was given a rather large page to work with (11.25 by 10.75 inches ) that was almost a square. Quite frequently the magazine would employ full typographic pages and titles which caught a lot of attention from competing magazines. Ginzburg let Lubalin take control of the magazine which includes spreads such as Lublin's personal interpretation and alterations to Picasso's erotic engravings by printing them in different colours, in reverse, in unusual backgrounds etc- to redesign Picasso into his own aesthetic. Prior to this success Lubalin was involved in the magazine Eros which sparked controversy for its erotic depictions. In this magazine Lubalin relied more on commissioned photographers ad editing photos and adding his own flair to illustration to create daring editorial spreads. When the magazine was banned Lubalin became also a semi-political designer and created designs for the magazine "Fact" which was a reaction the publicity "Eros" received. The image on the right is the Eros page spread. What i love about this style is that its still remains simplistic but uses simple accents of colour to bring the page to life. I also like the combination of illustration and photography- something i have not yet explored but would love to is being able to create designs and understand how to layout grids in magazines and newspapers so the layout compliments the design. I also appreciate his daring and "going against the grain" attitude towards orthodox outlooks and still developing this slightly erotic magazine. Below is a page from Avant Garde were Lubalin used more typography to create visual beauty within his designs. I absolutely love the cleverness of organising the text in blocks to create an image of the American Flag. By simply changing the font size and arrangement his has created a simple but clear design. Also the simple use of bold colours that hint to the american flag as well as the slight differences in typeface also highlight the title and issue of the magazine as well. So this design not only highlights the aesthetics of itself but also the issue the magazine is trying to communicate. his work will influec ethe way in which i organize paragrpahys in futrure pwrok and also appreciating teh affects of having a grid within work and also teh size and arrangement of text.

http://www.eyemagazine.com/feature/article/rethinking-lubalin     http://www.famousgraphicdesigners.org/herb-lubalin

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Avant Garde- Lubalin Page

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Stefan Sagmeister

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Stegan Sagmeister

When i was watching the documentary on Helvetica, i became aware that there were groups of people who didn't like the unison and deadpan quality of fonts like helvetica that almost became a default for signs, advertisements etc. People like Sagmeister didn't like the lifeless quality of Helvetica as he thought the letters didn't have a personality or character and how uniform it was. Sagmeister loved to doing hand drawn illustrations to create his typefaces as well as using material and objects to create his typefaces. For example the photo above on the right was made by one of his students actually cutting into his skin. Immediately the typeface has character and expression. The detail and the imagery immediately tells a narrative within the typeface that Helvetica could not do. Sagmeister is more into being expressive within his typefaces.  He is famous for designing album covers such as The rolling Stones,  Lou Reed (on the upper left), Aerosmith, Jay Z etc. His work includes a lot of disorientating images and a lot of text on body. Sagmeister enjoyed making CD designs and always made sure the style and aesthetic of the artists was filtered through into the designs. He used a combination of printing and packaging methods that involved laser-cuts, die-cuts, building models- but essentially the witty an daring concepts created amazing covers that led him to win 2 grammy awards for his designs. I think what his work has opened me too is trying to find new ways - not just digital to create fonts and to consider hand drawn typefaces and consider new methods to create interesting typefaces that have a "human" feel to them.

Helvitica documentary        https://www.aiga.org/medalist-stefan-sagmeister/  

http://www.famousgraphicdesigners.org/stefan-sagmeister

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Quim Marin

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“In such a visually polluted environment I try to come up with fresh and memorable designs with a clear aim at essential beauty and equilibrium that, at the same time, will ensure communicative effectiveness"- Marin

 

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David Carson

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Noma Bar

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Noma Bar

Noma Barr's work consist of beautiful, clean-cut, bold illustrations, He is known for his distinctive bold and simplistic style that always includes images within images. By doing so he has created double meaning within his pieces as well as cleverly understanding how to use shapes to compliment other shapes to skilfully communicate his ideas with clarity. His style of work involves bold colours and show aspects of Russian constructivist propaganda. He loves to tell stories within his pieces as well as including humor to communicate his ideas. His artwork has involved political themes. His style started with Sadam Husseins face which he associated with a radiation symbol. His work does occasional hold symbolic meaning. I admire his skilful use of iconography to create his images. I also appreciate his reductionist quality within his art and how he has mastered the use of simple shapes in his designs. I also appreciate his limited colour palette that still makes the work look exciting but not unfinished. I love his extended understanding on the effects on impact of negative and positive space. "Maximum communication with minimal elements". I love his knowledge on shape and negative and postive space and how it can be cleverly manipulated to create new images within images. His work brings me joy and heightened interest into illustration and how complicated ideas can be so simply communicated

http://dutchuncle.co.uk/noma-bar/  https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2013/nov/11/noma-bar-portrait-artist

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3DDA WEEK 3/10/16

Maiko Takeda

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Maiko Takeda

Originally from Tokyo Maiko is a milliner and jewellery designer. She uses the environment as inspiration and consideration for her pieces, aspects like shadow, gravity and light and all taken into account in her pieces. Her piece on the left includes thin plastic film that has been tinted colours that connect to a frame that is made around the body. This with the right background and light gives that affect of an aura surrounding the model. This specific collection was inspired by the space and futuristic aesthetic. She also took inspiration by the theme of lucid dreaming and wanting to be able to transpire that into something physical and visual. 

http://www.dezeen.com/2013/06/01/atmospheric-reentry-by-maiko-takeda

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Maarten Baas

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Maarten Baas

Baas's chairs are unusual not so much in design but in the choice of material. No one would usually think of using ceramic as a material to make chairs out of as it can be very brittle a delicate but putting optimal functionality aside Baas experimenting has led to beautiful ceramic chairs. By using this un-orthodox material the chair clearly has signs of craftsmanship on it giving the chair character and reflection upon the skill of the craftsman. It was made by hand moulding synthetic clay around a metal frame. The hand moulding gives the curvy outlines of the chair which makes it seem less sure of its self and a little bit wobbly but this just adds to the humble characterisation of the chair and its design. No moulds are used in production making each chair unique with its own dents and quirks. The simple design highlights the material itself and using bold colours highlights the form of and wobbles of the chair which creates playful quality.

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Alexander Mcqueen

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Alexander Mcqueen

Mcqueens involvement a in fashion and textile is absolutely monumental. With almost a anarchist approach to the fashion industry his design and inspiration very totally and thus are open to new exciting possibilities and beautiful outcomes. Mcqueen has created a variety of politically inspired pieces that forces people to pay attention to the issues that usually would never be mentioned. He is known for his revolutionary and crazy designs such as the armadillo shoes that was an unorthodox design and almost unwearable. He has made various statements such as his show of called the :"highland rape show" where models eyes were blanked out with translucent plastic and there breasts on show behind ripped dresses. above his a dress Mcqueen designed that was inspired by oysters made out of many many many layers of silk. 

http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/exhibitions/exhibition-alexander-mcqueen-savage-beauty/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_McQueen

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Issey Miyake

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Issey Miyake

Issey Miyake is a fashion designer as well as a fragrance connoisseur. His designs are very technology driven and in one aspect or another involves concepts of technology to create his textile. In the 1908s he decided to experiment and investigate the new methods of pleating and folding that could allow flexibility for movement of the model as well as ease of care and production. The garments designed, cut and assembled together , then placed between layers of paper and red into a heat press (thus creating pleats). When the World design Conference was held in Japan he sent a letter to the head questioning why textiles and clothing wasn't considered. Miyake's approach to clothing was more design orientated than fashion orientated which gained attention. in 1970 Miyake participated in the TORAY KNIT EXHIBITION where he designed clothing items made of separate sections that could easily be taken apart and assembled. He continued with a a bunch of collaborators to develop a number of new fabrics that incorporated tradition hand crafted fibres with the latest technology to create a hybrid.While making cutting edge innovative textile with technology and incorporating it into his pieces, He also visited historic production regions and familiarised and reused old traditional textile methods and processes. In his current 2016 summer collection he created a new fabric that is baked and stretched, giving the material undulating from but softness. The collection is made from heat reactive fabrics that have wavy and linear lines of heat reactive glue. When this glue is placed in a baking machine the glue swells and expands in the oven, resulting in protruding bands of fabric that also creates pleats.

What I like about his designs are that they are very technologically advanced and incorporate technology to easily make beautiful patterns and shapes. I also appreciate his attention to detail and design to make textile comfortable but easy to mould and use.

http://www.dezeen.com/2014/11/12/issey-miyake-yoshiyuki-miyamae-interview-3d-stretch-seam-fashion-technology/

http://mds.isseymiyake.com/im/en/work/

 

 

 
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INTERACT The Anar foundation Anti-child abuse poster 25/10/16

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The spanish charity has developed a poster that shows an anti child abuse hotline to children. The poster reveals a totally different image depending on what height you are and your point of view which changes the poster entirely. The poster has been made so that that shorter individuals (the height of most kids) would have a different poster image than people of taller height. This is done by the special lenticular printing technique more often seen in novelty postcards. The lense is biconvex which means it can hold two images at the same time that only can be viewed by specific angles. The lenticular affect also means that images can appear 3D without the need of 3D Glasses.

"There was a time that an outdoor poster campaign like this would be limited to the city it appeared in. But digital video allowed ANAR to share its unique message and shine a light on this worldwide issue. In its launch week the video received 7.7 million views and more than 37,000 Facebook shares."

The strategies to initiate the interaction with this poster is extremely subtle and has to be. The foundation was hoping that this would raise the confidence of children to call the hotline a it only appears to people with a certain height. The interaction is extremely subtle and one would not know that there are two different images being displayed at the same time if they couldn't move up and down the poster. I think its really clever and especially for the delicate situation of child abuse where the adult usually has control and intimidation over the child- this poster makes the adult oblivious to the secret message and hotline. However I think there are little flaws with this as how can one be sure that a kid is of average height and what if he/she cannot read the message?  I think the poster campaign was successful globally in delivering the message of child abuse being a serious and current issue that needs help and attention and [people shouldn't turn a blind eye towards it. This poster went viral on pinterest ,facebook, youtube and tumblr, so I think it has at least  gained global attention and put more light on the issue. However I'm not entirely sure how successful it was in actually gaining calls from children reporting there abuse. I think the interactive element sends a very clear and clean message. To an adult it reads "sometimes, child abuse is only visible to the child suffering it." But when a child looks at the ad, they see bruises on the boy's face and a different message: "if somebody hurts you, phone us and we’ll help you" with the hotline. And knowing how the messages change according to whether or not you are a child or an adult highlights how child abuse has been kept in the dark and is an issue that is almost like taboo or not given any importance.

http://sofii.org/case-study/aid-to-children-and-adolescents-at-risk-foundation-anar-secret-anti-abuse-message

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2320324/The-anti-child-abuse-poster-seen-children.html

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Chris O shea Cybrid Landscape

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Cybrids – a link on the continuum between concrete objects and abstract data. The line that separates data from objects represents a continuum rather than a division. Today there are situation where data and concrete objects work together to create new spatial entities, herein called ‘cybrids’. A cybrid is a hybrid of physical and electronic spaces.” (Peter Anders 2001)

Cybrid Landscape investigates how physical space can be combined with virtual space.A 3D virtual and landscape represents the flooring of a building. As people walk around the building , they wear away the landscape beneath them in the virtual pace, showing you the history of movement that has occurred. Portland Square in Plymouth uses the Arch OS operating system for its buildings- which is an intelligent architectural software that allows interactive art and the latest computing. This software has been developed to be to manifest the life and movement of the building.

Interaction are made without the viewer realising they are already interacting with the piece. Due to this they are unaware fo the virtual landforms they are created which creates spontaneous and insightful structures on the lives  and movement within the building. Sometimes the virtual landform is shown the the viewers which instigates viewers to move a different way to create a different kind of landform. It is clever as it combines virtual and real physical realities together and allows people to interact with both. I think the interaction is very successful because the person has to walk through the building regardless of where they need to go so ultimately there is 100% interaction. I think the interactive element made the work memorable because it is essential what creates the final piece of work and without it the work wouldn't exist. I think the interactive element provides the piece with a personal touch, the audience is essentially creating the art.

http://www.chrisoshea.org/cybrid-landscape

 

 

 

 

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Audience

The idea of audience was designed by Random international which included 64 headsize mirror objects that were placed in an order like that of a semi circle and had connected circuits in a room. Each objects moves in a specific way to give it a different characteristics of human behaviour and resulting in a basic personality. some move slightly up and down to make it seem like they are chatting, some shy away and look down and others have quick swift movements to exude confidence and demand your attention. If there are any viewers in close proximity, he mirrors inquisitively follow the viewers if they find them interesting. Once interest is established all the head sin sync turn towards the viewer. The viewer will see dozens of they're faces in the mirrors of these objects. The mirrors can watch this person until they become disinterested and look for something else. The viewer has absolutely no control over the installation.

"The installation aims to reverse the roles of the viewer and the viewed during this in-voluntary interaction. It seeks to establish a different kind of relationship between viewer and technology. Will other members of the audience experience the sensation of being ignored or excluded when they are not the centre of attention? Will the installation create a feeling of un-ease and unsettlement? The work investigates if machines can evoke diverse emotional reactions with the simplest of means."

I thin kit is very successful in sparking interaction as the mirrors are already moving before hand as if they're are almost alive and interact with each others and act as individuals. not all the movements are the same which shows a variety of interesting kinetic movements. Initially this will spark some curiosity that will attract viewers. It also maintains interaction as the mirrors slowly react with the viewer when they get close enough and start moving in unison with the viewer. Taking into account these are mirrors and reflections of the viewers face will be shown with to the viewer- it sparks an interesting conceptual idea as well as physical interaction which makes it a impactful piece. The piece could also be used to make an eery photoshoot depending on the lighting and the mechanism could be used for a animation/graphics poster etc. I love teh conceptual motive as well as the way the mirrors seem to have a mind and character their own.

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WHITE SPACE Lars Von Trier 6/11/2016

Lars Von Trier is a danish screenwriter and film director and is best known for the films breaking the waves, dancer in the dark, Melancholia and Europa. Other films include Idioten that followed Dogme rules - however this film received less appreciation from the public. He has large and controversial career that spans almost four decades. His work is distinct in terns of specific genre and technical innovation. themes he consistently tackles in existential, political and social issues, combating things like mercy, sacrifice and mental health as well. His break through really was in 1984 for his film "The element of crime" which received 12 awards in 7 different film festivals. The film included slow, nonlinear pacing, with multi-level plot design and dark dream like visuals which mirrored European historical traumas in a new way that gave him such an outstanding ovation. In 1995 he along side Vinterberg introduced dogme 95 and produced a dogme trilogy named " Golden Heart Trilogy". Each film is about naive heroes that keep their "golden hearts" depsite encountering numerous tragedies. This trilogy consists of Breaking the waves, the idiots and dancer in the dark, only teh idiots is certified a dogme 95 film. in 2003 he created with Jørgen Leth "The five obstructions". Teh film is a documetary that incoporates segments of experimental films produced by the film makers. Von Trier wanted to create a challenge for his friend and mentor so he chose his favourite film by Leith- "The perfect Human" and asked Leth to remake all the film but each time with a different "obstruction". The obstructions:

  1. Leth must remake the film in Cuba, with no set, and with no shot lasting longer than twelve frames, and he must answer the questions posed in the original film; Leth successfully completes this task.
  2. Leth must remake the film in the worst place in the world but not show that place onscreen; additionally, Leth must himself play the role of "the man." The meal must be included, but the woman is not to be included. Leth remakes the film in the red light district of Mumbai, only partially hiding it behind a translucent screen.
  3. Because Leth failed to complete the second task perfectly, von Trier punishes him, telling him to either remake the film in any way he chooses, or else to repeat it again with the second obstruction in Mumbai. Leth chooses the first option and remakes the film in Brussels, using split-screen effects.
  4. Leth must remake the film as a cartoon. He does so with the aid of Bob Sabiston, a specialist in rotoscoping, who creates animated versions of shots from the previous films. As such the final product is technically an animation but not a cartoon. Nevertheless, von Trier considers the task to be completed successfully.
  5. The fifth obstruction is that von Trier has already made the fifth version, but it must be credited as Leth's, and Leth must read a voice-overnarration, ostensibly from his own perspective but in fact one written by von Trier.

More recent films include the Depression Triology that is said to reflect Triers own depression:

Antichrist- about a grieving couple who escape to a cabin in teh woods hoping they would return to their "eden" to repair their marriage and sad hearts, sadly the situation worsens.

Melancholia- a psychological drama about two sisters preparing for a wedding as a planet is about to collide with Earth. The concept was inspired by a depressive episode he had and how people can remain peaceful within such catastrophic and terrible situations.

Nymphomaniac- After  the main character is discovered beaten in an alley, a self-diagnosed nymphomaniac (Charlotte Gainsbourg) recounts the erotic story of her adolescence and young adulthood. Starring Charlotte Gainsbourg, Stellan Skarsgård, Shia LaBeouf, Jamie Bell, and Willem Dafoe.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lars_von_Trier    

http://www.ephemerajournal.org/contribution/five-obstructions-experiencing-human-side-enterprise

 

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Gerd Arntz ISOTYPE

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8/9/16

Above shows images of his ISOTYPEs that were asked to be designed by Neurath. These graphic designs were made because working class individuals were usually illiterate and could not understand scientific or complicated language to explain politics, inequality etc. These designs were therefore carefully created so the average working class would be able to understand through pictures which eliminated the obstruction and confusion of language as a barrier. These images now progressed into what we know as infographics. these were also created for standardisation, being able to morph illustration into coherent bodies of work so ideas could be easily interpreted and understood.There were also meant to be designed to be simple and visual pleasing and not overly complicated so that they could be easily recognised.

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Gerd Arntz and Embroidery Brain Storm

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Embroidery and Gerd Brainstorm

Above is a picture of my brainstorms of the embroidery and Gerd Arntz. Embroidery is varied across different cultures with specific styles, patterns and textiles, made with excellent skill and patience. Traditionally made with hand, in recent types embroidery can be done as well with machinery.Originally it was a marking of a woman's path into womanhood but also depicted social ranking. Below is a photo of indian embroidery that i am absolutely in love with. I love the geometric shapes and patterns and appliques.

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Indian Embroidery

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Maricor/Marica

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Maricor/Maricar

This studio cleverly combined both the art of typography, graphics and embroidery to create these beautiful pieces of cotton thread on cotton fabric work. The work ranges from complicated fonts to simple block fonts that with several different styles of stitching create beautiful pieces with dimension. The studio was thrilled by the playful qualities thread could provide and played with surfaces as well as colour within their pieces. Inspired by artist like Megan Whitmarsh, and do an unorthodox style of crewel embroidery, and "paint with stitches". A lot of their work involves transferring graphics onto a different medium. I love how it combines typography and stitching together and perhaps should be considered for my designs.

http://maricormaricar.com/

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Plastic

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Plastic

During class we were given the material plastic. above is a brainstorm of things related to plastic. Currently in life plastic is an abundant source with almost every appliance and product using at least a little bit of plastic. Plastic are polymers made of hydrogen and carbon. The longer the hydrocarbon chains the stronger plastic can be made, this make plastic extremely versatile as well as being abel to take up many different physical properties such as colour and surface finish. It is also cheap but made of oil, a un-renewable source and let of toxic fumes when being burnt. There also seems to be a element of being "fake" associated with plastic, for example barbie dolls and an un-natural quality associated with plastics.  Plastics are also uused in textile as well as oil paints, an example of it as a textile is polyester. 

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Library Research 12/9/16

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First time in the library

I found a book called "Furniture" by Penny Sparke. The picture above is the photo of a inflatable PVC chair designed by Quasar Khanh in 1967. The 60s is when inflatable furniture was very popular due to its increasing flexibility and portability. This was when furniture design rejected the idea of static, status ridden objects. this mirrored the desire of social mobility. Even though this "out of the box" design at the time was interesting and popular it almost disintegrated as quickly as it started. Furniture was used as a status symbol and designs like this rioted against that idea.  The architectural group called Archigram took this to the extremes. Though plastic still remained extremely useful and important within furniture design.

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Library Research 12/9/16

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FINE ART WEEK 19/9/16

19/9/16- Tate Modern research

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Visiting the Tate modern

Today I started My Fine Arts Pathway. The theme we were given was Collection. My class had a small talk on a variety of different artists including: Song Dong, Dieter Roth, Susan Hiller, Nicholas Nixon, Haim Steinbach, Taryn Simon, Jim Shaw, Martin Parr, Richard Wentworth, Lisa Milroy and Oliver Croy. It was clear that every artist had a different approach to how and why the collected their items as well as the way they presented it and displayed it. The artists obviously thought clearly about how to display their work and arrange it, so the desired affect would skilfully be created. To witness this first hand we took a trip to the Tate Modern to see how these "collections" were displayed, made, organised as well as learn about the artist's methodology and process in creating these works of art.

Above is a installation taken by the "solemn process" series (1964-2008)by the Artist Ana Lupas. It began as a traditional cultural ritual involving craft work of straw wreaths in Romania. She worked with villagers to produce these wreathes with the materials of straw and clay that were usually involved for the assembly of housing and fencing. The objects didn't play any practical function, she encouraged villagers to use these varying size objects as decor - to simply be placed in there homes or on landscapes however they wanted to, they were then photographically documented and the collection grew over time. however in the mid 1970s due to the restrict political situation, less and less people became involved and development ceased. She then realised the wreathes were starting to decay and she wanted to desperatley preserve them and in turn preserve the culture.She frantically tried to restore the wreaths which failed which lead to her finding a new way to preserve them- By making metal casings.

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Theaster Gates - Civil Tapestry

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Civil Tapestry 2011

Above is a piece called Civil Tapestry made out of fire hoses and wood. I think out of all the pieces we looked at this was my favourite despite its simplicity and initially ambiguousness and initial emotional detachment. Despite its very simple design and form the piece holds extremely meaningful significance. In May 1963 a group of black children were marching peacefully for equal rights in Alabama. Police used extremely powerful hoses to break up the march, causing injury to many of the young protesters. Gates arranged the strips of firehoses to resemble the inequality black people faced. The hoses were also a reference to a lot of black churches that were burned due to racial discrimination. The collection of the similar toned colour stripes of firehoses initially seem to portray a lack of emotional or meaningful depth. However after the context is revealed that it is actually a very deeply political and emotional piece towards the artist. 

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Bernd and Hilla Becher

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Bernd and Hilla Becher

Their photographs of industrial structures focus on the significance and the visual appearance of their subjects. Their extremely strict manner of their documentation using photography was influential for photographers that followed. They wokred from 1957-2007 and photographed over 200 industrial plants and buildings in Europe and North America. The likes to call their subjects "Anonymous Structures"

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Tom Friedman

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Tom Friedman

I actually have seen Friedman's work before on the internet when I was writing my extended essay on the prevalence of minimalism in contemporary art and i absolutely fell in love with  "open black cube" and its simplicity. Im in love with the black and white them as well as the basic shape of the cube. I thought it was extremely clever to only show the corner of the cube rather than the whole frame like Sol Lewitt. I also love the conceptual idea of the piece- the fact that it is actually an open cube physically but mentally the mind imagines the form of the complete frames. Tom is a conceptual sculptor and loves investigating the relationship between the viewer the object.  His work has been described as "Friedman’s deadpan presentation implies content and form are seamless". He is also known from transforming simple objects into interesting pieces of art. He also approaches art with humour while also critiquing art and life itself.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Friedman_(artist)

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GRAPHICS COMMUNICATION DESIGN WEEK 26/9/16

26/9/16- Research

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Lucy and Jorge Orta

Today was our first lesson in the GDC pathway and today we did a short project on Fashion communication. Above is an image from Lucy and George Orta from the "Refuge Series". A few years before I stumbled upon Lucy and George Orta and i loved their work because not only did i like how it looked, but i also loved the concept of actually being able to wear these pieces of art and how they actually had a physical purpose. I loved how they thought of the form and function as well as of the aesthetics and how they cleverly merged it all into one. Having an interest in GDC I am interested in all component parts within GDC and i think that Lucy and George Orta's work are one of my favourites within this area. First of all the concept behind this series is the idea of being able to having clothing that can turn into a shelter to keep one safe from harsh condition. It started through the first gulf war  which lead to a stock market crash and resulted in poor economic conditions. This temporary shelters and architectures therefore also symbolise the gruelling global crisis and also mirror the alarming situation of need for shelter and safety for the Kurd Refugees. What i  love about their work is that immediately through these photos i instantly get the message of safe, home and shelter as well as functionality and usability. There is clear communication of these aspects with the design itself but also in the composition and organisation of the photos as well, which I truly admire. The refuge wear can be converted in backpacks and be used by nomadic populations. The transformation of the shelter is key to the concept of freedom. They also include objects for function and conceptual and symbolic uses. the functionality provides minimum space for the user but also uses telescopic carbon armatures that raise teh fabric above the body to prevent claustrophobia. I adore the pieces functional aspects and design as well as they're conceptual meaning and how effective this is presented through they're photography 

http://www.studio-orta.com/en/artworks/serie/1/Refuge-Wear    

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2009/sep/30/artist-lucy-orta

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Hussein Chalayan

Chalayan uses film, installation and sculptural forms to investigate perception and the realities of modern contemporary life. He is known for his minimalistic aesthetic made by unique designs, and tailoring. Chalayan pieces involves contemporary interiors, architectural aspects and geometric designs that create the minimalist modern pieces. He even has pieces were models stand under water drops from the ceiling having their clothes disintegrate to cultural statements such as models wearing varying length of black clothing commenting on the muslim conservatism of the female body. Some of his designs that include furniture like objects can be folded down to envelope size. He explores how objects can be combined with textile and design and moulds them to compliment each other very skilfully while still creating interesting contrasts of traditional materials in fashion. His futuristic designs also include functionality. fro example he designed a skirt that combined interior design and geometric shapes that could be used as a table and a skirt (see image below). I love the design of these modern pieces that border on and question the traditional pre-assumptions of fashion. I appreciate teh detail to design that looks good but also, again like Orta is also able to carry out a useful function. I love the boldness of his pieces by using un-orthodox designs and materials within his fashion.

http://www.dazeddigital.com/fashion/article/26842/1/hussein-chalayan-talks-making-dresses-dissolve-on-the-runway

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Hussein

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Favre

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El Lissitzky

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Despite Lissitzky's simple and minimalistic style, he work was able to communicate import political issues that was going in 1900-1940 in Russia. He used shapes and colour and spanned from graphic design, typography, photography, photomontage, book design, and architectural design. He greatly influenced modern art such as Bauhaus instructors. He considered graphic design to be conduit that could effectively reach the public, thus his work contained a lot of unfiltered political opinions and messages.His Suprematist Proun series existed at "the station where one changes from painting to architecture.", using simple 2D shapes provided different spatial perspectives despite being 2D. He simply used primary colours, black and white with simple 2D shapes , both real and imagined constructions to tell narratives within his posters. His artistic interests at the time revolved a lot around jewish themes and culture. in 1919 he met Kazmir Malevich a painter and founder of Suprematism- where pure geometric form had larger importance over representation. He also embraces Constructivism which used abstract art to express social values and ideas. His work has allowed me to understand more clearly the simplicity of shapes and colour in graphic design and has taught me to consider simplifying my designs and try to not overcomplicate my work.

http://www.theartstory.org/artist-lissitzky-el.htm

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"Eros" page spread- Lubalin

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Saul Bass- Its a mad mad world

Saul Bass

After looking at still drawing and illustration we then looked at how to bring these images to life. Saul Bass is well known for his smart and smooth title sequences and was awarded several awards for his film making and worked alongside people such as Alfred Hitchcock and Stanley Kubrick. His first really major piece of work was a title sequence for "man with the gold arm" that was bout a sensational saxophone player with a heroine addiction- this at the time was considered taboo. Bass incorporated arms in his animation to bring light to the subject through his movie openings. hIs smooth and clever transitions as well as style  made him a highly successful and respected graphic designer. Bass had a few philosophies he followed by for example - ’try to reach for a simple, visual phrase that tells you what the picture is all about and evokes the essence of the story”. Again a reoccurring aim  in graphic design is being able to be innovative by trying to create simple visual communication to a large audience. I love his ability to be able to cleanly created animations that flow very well to the next frame. For example in the video above from "its a mad mad world", the world in the animation gets transformed into so many other items that allow the opening credits to be shown. This fun and an innovative visual communication is what i strive to be able to do while clearly maintaining my style. Another philosophy Bass kept in mind was "getting the audience to see familiar parts of their world in an unfamiliar way". I love his ability through graphics to make people question themselves and the world around them and appreciate ho graphics art just as well as fine arts can ask the public question through visual imagery as well. Even more so perhaps as GCD is able to communicate these ideas through usually simple designs that can be understood by a extremely large audience for example Gerd Arntz and his pictograms. Bass was also known for his graphic logo designs for Bell and Kleenex. Bass change the world of title credits were it would be static and mundane. He however made the credits a film of their own making them far more important and a key piece to the films. He also had a influential distinct minimal style. His work really inspires me to make a quirky animation that can be applied to my "Lost character" design that i made in class.

http://www.artofthetitle.com/designer/saul-bass/   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saul_Bass

https://99designs.co.uk/blog/creative-inspiration-en-gb/saul-bass-graphic-designer-of-a-century/

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Laura Callaghan

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Laura Callaghan

Callaghan is an irish based illustrator living in London whom illustrations reflect the lives and opinions of girls living in contemporary life. a lot of her work contains a lot of references to pop and teen culture as well as aspects of modern life. In her collection "Aspirations" she takes the "inspirational" quotes and applies them to the reality of modern life and how impractical they may seem. For example the quote “Happiness will never come to those who don’t appreciate what they already have.” Callaghan depicts the realistic troubles of girls in modern life and societies where these quotes are laughable as modern life contains realistic hardships such as debt and societal pressures that don't make times in life ideal. Callaghan work is a commentary of the true struggles of life as well as a sassy critique on modern life, media, society, culture etc. She also comments these most often through the voice of a female and the struggles and contradictions girls face. What i love about her work is the style and the ability to relate to the situations and frustrations (sometimes there are even hints of anger in her work as she comments on modern life) that are depicted in her images. I also love her use of characterisation within her illustrations which give the picture a narrative and character. I also adore her style of drawing as well as her colour choices in her pieces. The choice to use pop and teen culture within her pieces appeal to me and make it tat much more relatable as well. I love the characterisation and i feel it relates to the sketches for illustration i have made as I have also made female characters with that are put in the same realistic situations girls in modern life have probably been in. Although we haven't looked specifically at illustration within our lessons i wanted to do a little research just so I have a wider understanding of how artists work, their styles that could potentially influence my work in the future  (for example portfolios for maybe a BA illustration course). I didn't want to just research typography but also how images such as illustration can convey an idea or message.

http://www.lauracallaghanillustration.com/    https://wetransfer.com/thisworks/2016/08/18/laura-callaghan/

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Laura Callaghan

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Matt Blease

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Matt Blease

Blease's artwork immediately includes funny but simple illustrations that hold visual puns that can be really deep commentary on modern life (for example the image above of his work). Blease says a lot of his inspiration comes from people and they're quirkiness and weirdness , as well as the misuse of language that inspires him to make his punny pieces. His approach to his artwork is to not take himself to seriously which is translated into well made but fun illustrations. A lot of his work was also inspired by the comics he read when he was little which developed his retro comic book style that remained playful. Being originally a graphic designer Blease says Graphic designing has helped him communicate his ideas without "getting lost in all the fuss" "Graphic designing is about problem solving" which has added to his simplistic but light style of illustration.bWhat i also love about his work that i would like to apply to mine is the use of comedy within pieces to make it funny for viewers as well as also being able to skilfully use comedy to convey a message.

http://www.mattblease.com/About   https://www.creativereview.co.uk/new-illustrators-matt-blease/

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Quim Marin

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3/10/16- Atelier XJC

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3/10/16- Atelier XJC

above displays experimental luxury jewellery  from the swiss company Atelier XJC with references to feathers and  large delicates ruffs. This specific collections includes bags ruffs, feathers and more sculptural pieces. Atelier XJC approach to their designing is attention to detail and understanding the material in order to create new unique luxury accessories. Their designs are extremely intricate and involve extremely calculated designs. They're designs are very minimalistic but altogether with the components are assembled make up large pieces of beautiful minimalistic accessories. Their unconventional jewellery breaks the boundaries between the traditional preconceptions of accessories and also opens up a new route on more architectural pieces that can also simply be appreciated for they're form and shape and clever use of understanding material. I really like the structural shoulder piece and how it accentuates the shoulder. I also love the feather/scale affect made by the material and how this texture creates a beautiful accessory.

http://www.yellowtrace.com.au/10th-anniversary-jewellery-by-atelier-xjc/  

http://www.dezeen.com/2012/03/05/10th-anniversary-jewellery-by-atelier-xjc/

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Martin Gamper

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Martino Gamper

The images above are from the collection of a 100 chairs in a 100 days were each day he designed a new chair that perhaps couldn't function but were new design ideas that could be developed further into pieces of furniture. He used objects as well as other chairs to create new exciting designs. In this project he collected unused chairs and morphed them into completely new designs. Having knowledge and experience in different materials he was able to create this new visually and conceptually stunning hybrid chairs. Gamper's design shows a complete disregard for historical ideas of symmetry and harmony within designs and ventures outwards experimentally with different material and forms. I love his spontaneous approach to his designs using only the materials he found and can use within his short one day projects. By doing so he has created very playful , carefree innovative designs which explores a variety of beautiful forms and marriages of varying material. " i try not to think too much when i make my work". I also love how clever Gamper is in that his designs look a bit chaotic and quickly and randomly put together when in reality these are all well thought through designs that are able to stand and be relatively sturdy. He has calculated and still taken into account the function of his chairs.

https://www.disegnodaily.com/article/in-the-studio-of-martino-gamper

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Reiko Sudo

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Reiko Sudo

Sudo is the current CEO and co-founder of the innovative Tokyo textile producer- "Nuno".Nuno takes the techniques, materials and aesthetics of traditional textiles reworks them and recreates them using modern and up to date technologies to create new fabrics and forms. The company i open to experimentation and works with a variety of material such as silk, cotton to hand made paper and aluminium. These fabrics are then altered by methods such as salt shrinking , rust dyeing and caustic burning. The results from this open experimentation is new innovation fabrics that not only hold interesting colour aspects but also have a new form and aesthetic. Nuno has also been synthesising and creating textile that are eco friendly by harnessing the power of technology. Threads with incompatible shrink ratios are tossed into a very hot dyer to create sculptural 3D textures. Experimentation such as metallic films and bind to thread to create transparent filigrees. 

 https://www.nuno.com/en/textile/

 

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WEEK 9&10 GRAPHICS

INTERACT Troika - Dark matter 25/10/16

Darker Matter

Troika’s metaphysically strange hanging sculpture Dark Matter (2014), a large black object that looks like a circle, a square or a hexagon depending on where you’re standing, probes (like Olde Wolber’s video) a very contemporary disturbance about the irreconcilability of subjective point-of-view and objective truth.’ – J.J. Charlesworth

 Conny Freyer, Eva Rucki, and Sebastien Noel create the trio that names itself "Troika" that has held several exhibition investigating light and space, above is the piece "darker Matter" made of black aluminium. The sculpture not only investigates light and space but also investigates how different forms that oppose each other can coexist within one piece. Traiko are interested in models that were made to make sense of the world around us- and how they turn into the norms for reality- and being able to step away from the constructed models of humanity and (like how the sculpture changes) and allowing/ make room for things whose truth and falsity is not yet known to you. The piece explores how contradiction and antithesis can exist together at the same time.

I love how the piece is all and none of the form. I love the investigation of view points with the piece and how it complete;y changes the experience of the viewer.  I also love the large scale of the sculpture and its simplicity.

 http://www.blouinartinfo.com/news/story/1040612/qa-troika-on-dark-matter-at-art-basel

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anti-abuse child poster

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rAndom international was commissioned by Royal Philips Electronics to create an interactive installation that unleashes the creative potential of the next generation OLED technology. In terms of TV screens, OLED produced there own light rather that LED which needs a white back light, this means that OLED can achieve a truly black background as no light is shining through pixels that do not need it- this is consider revolutionary and predicted to become extremely popular. In awe of the beautiful mirror finish of the individual OLED modules they decided to create a installation that allows the audience to engage with the light physically. The wall of OLED reflects and mirrors the objects and people in front of it and subtly and smoothly fades the mirror image into the light. The installation is a playful kinetic interaction that allows the one to physically interact with light via the  Less than 2mm thick, the ultraflat surface of the OLED that can be integrated into most design and construction materials.

I think think installation is extremely successful in initiating the interaction as there is a sheer amount of curiosity to the audience upon seeing this large expanse of bright light that makes the viewers want to approach and stare into the light. I think the sheer curiosity and intensity of the installation makes viewers want approach it and interact with it. I also think there is a playful and fun quality of the installation so it is enjoyable and fun to viewers. It encourages you to move around and interact with it, to create interesting shapes and movement that slowly and smoothy fades back into the light. I think that the interactive element makes it exceptionally memorable as it is the experience of movement and the OLEDs reflecting your movements that make it enjoyable and fun. It is also the way the reflections fade that create lasting impact on the viewer and the audience, not to mention the high tech thin wall.

http://www.chrisoshea.org/you-fade-to-light

http://www.enlightermagazine.com/projects/fade-light-random-international

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WHITE SPACE Manuel Raeder 6/11/2016

Dogma rules " the Vow of Chasity"

Dogma rules " the Vow of Chasity"

Dogme was an avante garde filming movement that was conceived in 1955 by danish filmmakers and directors such as Lars Von Trier and Thomas Vinterberg who created the "Dogme 95 Manifesto and the "vow of Chasity". There were strict rules were to be followed to create film making that were based on the traditional values of narrative, acting and theme, disregarding extensive elaborate special effects and technology. It was a movement that sought to bring back power to the director as an artist as opposed to the studio. Vinterberg claimed tat these set of rules were made within 45 minutes and were extremely strict and difficult to follow. The first of the Dogme films (Dogme #1) was Vinterberg's 1998 film Festen and won the Jury prize at the Cannes Film Festival that year.

Rules:

  1. Filming must be done on location. Props and sets must not be brought in (if a particular prop is necessary for the story, a location must be chosen where this prop is to be found).
  2. The sound must never be produced apart from the images or vice versa. (Music must not be used unless it occurs where the scene is being filmed).
  3. The camera must be hand-held. Any movement or immobility attainable in the hand is permitted. (The film must not take place where the camera is standing; filming must take place where the action takes place.)
  4. The film must be in colour. Special lighting is not acceptable. (If there is too little light for exposure the scene must be cut or a single lamp be attached to the camera).
  5. Optical work and filters are forbidden.
  6.  The film must not contain superficial action. (Murders, weapons, etc. must not occur.)
  7.  Temporal and geographical alienation are forbidden. (That is to say that the film takes place here and now.)
  8.  Genre movies are not acceptable.
  9.  The final picture must be transferred to the Academy 35mm film, with an aspect ratio of 4:3, that is, not widescreen. (Originally, the requirement was that the film had to be filmed on Academy 35mm film, but the rule was relaxed to allow low-budget productions.)
  10. The director must not be credited.

-Ironically Vinterberg has claimed to have broken some of the rules for his first film. He confessed to covering up a window and changing the lighting to suit the filming.The main goals of this manifesto was to make the film purely focused on the narrative an the acting rather than visual effects.In a way by creating these rigid rules one is forced to think imaginatively of how they would combat a situation to make it work within the confinements.

http://uffilmanalysisfour.pbworks.com/w/page/7284607/Rules%20for%20Making%20a%20Dogme%20Film 

 http://nofilmschool.com/2014/02/explanation-of-the-controversial-film-movement-dogme-95-by-co-creator-lars-von-trier

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WHITE SPACE Brian Eno

Brian Eno is an english musician, composer, record producer, singer, writer and a visual artist. He is famous for his work in ambient and electronic music as well as contributing to rock, worldbeat, chance and generative music genres. Eno has stuck to the methodology of "Theory over practice consistently throughout his career and has introduced original unique recording techniques and conceptual approaches to contemporary music.

In 1975 th emusicion andpainter Pter Schmidt crates a set of flash cards that they called "oblique Strategies". THey have been freinds since art school and had shared guidelines that could unleash artists "blocks" and probide new exciting options when tehy didnt know how to progress forward with thei pieces. The first editino of 115 flash cards were black on one side with text on the other that included instructions/aphorism on teh back such as "Honour thy error as a hidden intention.”, “Use non-musicians”, “Tape your mouth.”etc. He states   ‘Oblique Strategies’ evolved from me being in a number of working situations when the panic of the situation—particularly in studios—tended to make me quickly forget that there were other ways of working and that there were tangential ways of attacking problems that were in many senses more interesting than the direct head-on approach.”

Eno is widely known for his ambient music featured in artists such as the talking heads, David Bowie, U2etc. Though Eno's most inspiring and confusing contribution to music is  the idea that musicians do their best work when they are unsure of what they are doing. His work is centred in the power of collaboration within systems such as: instructions, rules and self imposed limits. He even created the word Scenius which defines how work created by a large group of people is indebted to the friction between the people that to the work of any single artist. For the majority of his career, Eno has stuck to manipulating synthesizers or tape, give or take a digital innovation, and is credited on many albums as providing “treatments.” However he has taught himself a lot of teh basic rock instruments and sings in most of his albums and recordings.

Eno’s strategies don’t always appeal to the musicians he works with. In Geeta Dayal’s book about the album, also titled “Another Green World,” the bassist Percy Jones recalls, “There was this one time when he gave everybody a piece of paper, and he said write down 1 to 100 or something like that, and then he gave us notes to play against specific numbers.” Phil Collins, who played drums on the album, reacted to these instructions by throwing beer cans across the room. “I think we got up to about 24 and then we gave up and did something else,” Jones said.

 https://www.theguardian.com/music/2010/jan/17/brian-eno-interview-paul-morley

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/07/07/ambient-genius

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WHITE SPACE James Turell

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James Turrell is one of my ultimate favourite artists. He is extremely skilful and innovative in exploring light and space and is able to transport audiences to ambient rooms of light and space that feels like a new dimension altogether. He has large installations that fill rooms and buildings and uses neon lights to create shapes, highlights, lines to explore light in his work. In 1966 Turrell began experimenting with light in his studio in Santa Monica, during which the Light and Space group of artist were situated in Los Angeles including Robert Irwin, Mary Corse and Doug Wheeler. Just by covering the windows in his room he created his first light projections. He has various collection including Shallow space constructions: where controlled light challenges the perception of the viewer, Corner Shallow spaces; where light is projected onto a convex corner to give the illusion of a 3D image, Wedgeworks; were light gives an uncanny illusion to becoming a barrier or wall, Dark Spaces: an extremely dim room with little light that allows the mind to "see what it wants to", Ganzfeld;a German word to describe the phenomenon of the total loss of depth perception as in the experience of a white-out, amongst other amazing series such as skyspaces and skylight series.Roden Crater is an extinct volcano and is considered one of Turell's best pieces of work. Since 1979 he has spent movings tons of dirt to create tunnels and rooms to turn this crater into a massive naked-eye observatory for experiencing celestial phenomena.

JAMES TURRELL: It’s about perception. For me, it’s using light as a material to influence or affect the medium of perception. I feel that I want to use light as this wonderful and magic elixir that we drink as Vitamin D through the skin—and I mean, we are literally light-eaters—to then affect the way that we see. We live within this reality we create, and we’re quite unaware of how we create the reality. So the work is often a general koan into how we go about forming this world in which we live, in particular with seeing.

http://jamesturrell.com/   http://www.interviewmagazine.com/art/james-turell/print/ 

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